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missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne ridgway was assistant secretary of state for europe and candidate from 1985-89. in her 32 year fo
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
deadlocked on how to resolve this crisis. noticed it, europe and arab nations are calling on a side to step down, loo but russia, chind iran continue to back assab. it states may well lose his status as the world's sole superpower by 2030. according to new report from the nationalst intelligence council. the united states to the obama intelligence rports suggestt wo will be first among equals as asia set to surpass north america and europe combined in terms of global power. joining us now to talk about implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a b
for the united states to open up a second front in western europe, and the british and roosevelt asked stalin to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the brit
that is necessarily the right body to do it. it certainly does not think that all 6000 banks in europe should be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking, but if they see continued failure of eurozone finance ministers to agree to this, we might get the restoration of finance of duties, which of costa much trouble in recent years. the deadline for agreeing is no overarching bank advisory super body is meant to be in place on january 1. it does not look likely, and a lot of frustration at this meeting today with the sides deeply divided and no sign of agreement. that, of course, is the basic issue -- why has there not an overarching supervisory control? precisely because it was difficult to do then. the eurozone crisis highlighted that failure, and we've still got the same problems blighting the regular meetings of finance ministers. >> despite the eurozone crisis, german exports are still robust. >> we will have the latest on the german export data later on in the progr
of energy to europe. >> putin was speaking in brussels, where he has been holding talks with eu leaders. his first visit after he was reelected. although russia and the you are close trading partners, there are various contentious issues which divide them. >> vladimir putin did not waste any time on arrival -- just a quick way that the cameras. outside, protesters clashed with police. the women's rights activists were not mincing words, telling the president to go to help -- go to hell. inside, the eu message to russia was also clear. >> we will discuss commitments to guarantee our citizens democratic rights. >> the biggest disagreement is over energy issues. the eu has been critical of new gas pipelines from russia. the south stream pipeline is meant to carry russian gas through bulgaria to austria and italy, but the u.s. and russia are arguing over the rules to be applied to the new pipeline. >> it is true that some difference remained regarding some aspects of energy relations between europe and russia. >> european demands for russia to separate gas companies and distribution channels hav
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
for flexible government policies if the situation in europe gets worse. >>> the new leader of the chooeds communist party is sending out mixed signals. xi jinping says he wants to pursue a peaceful foreign policy. at the same time, china is locked in territorial disputes with japan and several southeast asian nations over islands in the east and south china seas. xi told a group of foreign academics in beijing that china poses neither a challenge nor a threat. >> translator: looking at china's history, cultural traditions, and current conditions, china will never adopt a policy of dominance or expansionism. our prosperity will bring peace and will benefit the rest of the world. >> analysts say xi hopes to ease concerns that china's new leadership intends to adopt a more hard-line stance in diplomacy. however, on the same day, he told a senior military commander to strengthen missile units for possible conflict. xi has pledged to tackle corruption among party officials. he and the rest of the new leadership are reportedly planning to overhaul the structure of government. government sources
fitness award, it ain't going to happen unless i am living in europe when there is precedent when the entire european union accepts the nobel peace prize. i am serious, they are serious, the same folks who brought you riots they could not stop and protests they could not control, and now they are winning a nobel peace prize that has to be unbelievable for a union that is going off the we rails and a currency that threatens to go off the abyss to former u.k. member of parliament john brown who is going out of his mind. i cannot believe this, but, yet, when i first heard it announced, it really happened. >> yes, you are absolutely right. when i was a nato soldier myself and when i was a member of parliament i was on the political arm of nato which was the north atlantic assembly and it was clear that it was nato particularly with the american and british nuclear deterrence that kept the peace and that extended through a circle around the ussr and margaret thanker made me the escort for gorbachev and it was clear that president reagan's strategic defense initiative brought them to th
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
are the afghans. the united states ended in western europe have no interest in occupying and colonizing afghanistan into the 51st state, or whatever. the afghans are there tuesday. the others come and go. -- are there to stay. the others come and go. >> puc much fighting? gregg's my time was split between the capital -- >> my time was split between the south. endand the >> you know afghanistan well. thank you for coming in. it has been over a month now since a americans gave president obama four more years in the white house. there are now more minority voters than ever before. and in large part, the republican candidate lost because he failed to reach out to them. if your than one in three latino's failed to vote -- fewer than one in three latino's failed to vote for mitt romney. what will the republican party need to do to get the hispanic vote? >> at a christmas party outside of boston, republicans are not feeling particularly festive -- outside of austin, republicans are not filling a particularly festive. they know they have a challenge in front of them. within two years, hispanics
and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain about the global economic taken to stabilize the euros zone. major central bank leaders are beefing up the coordinated action to secure confidence in global financial markets. they're extending a program that makes it easier for commercial banking to borrow money. taking part are the u.s. federal reserve and the european central bank as well as the central banks of canada, britain and switzerland. the leaders agreed to extend the foreign currency liquidity swap by one year. the arrangement was set to expire next february. the bank of japan whether to join the plan at the policy meeting next week. it was introduced last november when commercial banks had trouble getting money from the markets due to the european credit concerns. the bank leaders say their decision shows they're taking all possible measures to ease global financial strains. >>> more business headlines for you next hour. here's a check on markets. >>> north korea's state-run media say the country's media oversaw the highly publicized launch this week. others say it
sales. figures show auto sales in europe shrunk by over 10% in november. >> that was the 14th month in a row that purchases declined according to the european automobile manufacturers association. buyers in italy, spain, and france proved especially wary. only britain bucked the trend with a rise in new car sales. a decade it has been since the inclusion of the german media empire. the state appellate court in munich today ruled that deutsche bank must pay damages to the heirs of the deceased mogul. >> the court ruled that the former ceo of deutsche bank, seen here, was responsible for the collapse of the world's largest licenser of film rights. in an interview, this credit worthiness was question, driving the conglomerate into bankruptcy. damages are expected to range anywhere from 120 million euros to 1.25 billion euros. it was also a big topic at the frankfurt stock exchange today. our market correspondent gave us this report from the trading floor. >> for the deutsche bank, this verdict is more than just a verdict because it weighs heavily on the image of germany's biggest bank.
berlusconi said he will try to replace him. >> on early exit for one of europe's most respected leaders. mario monti resigned months before the end of his term. he handed his resignation to italy's president shortly after the lower house of parliament approved his one-yearlong government. >> my words will be with every probability the last act and the last words before those who where i formerly hand in my resignation to the head of state. thank you very much to allow me to conclude with you this difficult but fascinating 13 months. >> monti announced he will resign after the people of freedom party. >> in less than two weeks of dialect, we have already gained five percentage points. so i hope we can aim for the 40% that could give us the victory. monti's future is still unclear. will he go back to being an economist or endorse parties that pledge to continue with his plan, reform. the former prime minister is expected to reveal his choice during a press conference on sunday morning. >> we expect mario monty to expect the decision over his future. that's where we will learn that friday
in western europe have no interest in occupying and colonizing afghanistan into the 51st state, or whatever. the afghans are there tuesday. the others come and go. -- are there to stay. the others come and go. >> puc much fighting? gregg's my time was split between the capital -- >> my time was split between the south. endand the >> you know afghanistan well. thank you for coming in. it has been over a month now since a americans gave president obama four more years in the white house. there are now more minority voters than ever before. and in large part, the republican candidate lost because he failed to reach out to them. if your than one in three latino's failed to vote -- fewer than one in three latino's failed to vote for mitt romney. what will the republican party need to do to get the hispanic vote? >> at a christmas party outside of boston, republicans are not feeling particularly festive -- outside of austin, republicans are not filling a particularly festive. they know they have a challenge in front of them. within two years, hispanics will outnumber whites in texas. >> if you wa
again, very tiny amounts of electricity, and in europe, we're seeing the green guru, james lovelock calls it the greatest folly on europe, relying on wind power to help base llad of electricity. denmark which people holds model, has not shut a single coal based plant or carbon based plant since they went all wind. sandra: easy to get emotional. so let's put facts. energy department under current administration spent $1.69 billion in loan guaranties for wind projects. >> yes. sandra: so far no offshore wind pardon me is operating today in american waters but yet we are now announcing tens of millions of more dollars being spent to do so. >> yeah. looks like first ones might go online in new jersey in 2013 or 2014. so it is still far away. even once you get it though, you still have all the other environmental issues from bird impacts, unsightlyness of it. it is intermittent power. all the money going into it, at the same time, we're shutting down coal and now the obama administration has announced its intent to go after natural gas tracking and shale oil -- fracking and shale oil bec
into what you think your version should be for adopting the paa that's why europe into asia because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it was not designed to be in the long term missile ballistic architecture. there's benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have diminished because they are mature of enough to have it. as far as the intercepters to be productive, you have to look across the technologies that we pursue, and recognize that the significant technology challenges that have been associated with that program, and really, i think you have to -- in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've done the technology part of the -- of this ballistic missile defense have done amazing things in that time frame, t
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
in eastern and central europe that are struggling to not only become members of the european union, but to join the north anti-ic treaty organization because they -- atlantic treaty organization because they are still seek a chance to be free from that kind of repression. i'm reminded what took place during the 2008 olympics, summer olympics, in georgia when we saw the incursion from putin's russia into georgia over the break away regions, and we continue to see lots of threats. it is a very dangerous world. very dangerous world. tragically, plato said only the dead have seen the end of war. and i remember this, we saw the demise of the soviet union, the kremlin, berlin wall, many of us did believe, and it was famously wrote about the end of history believing that political pluralism, rule of law, and self-determination, and democratic institutions would thrive all over the world. well, it hasn't quite worked out that way in the last couple of decades. and we all know what the consequences of those threats have been for the first time ever. we had the kind of attack we did on septe
democrats and in europe. they need some time to be more able -- to be able -- they are very successful on the side of the opposition. right now in sight of the government, there is a tremendous responsibility. we have seen that from the parliamentarian elections were the muslim brothers in egypt but the majority. until the results, they lost 4 million of votes. this is why we have a responsibility in the united states to support democratic institutions not allowing any ideological block to hijack the revolution or the institutions. at the same time, not taking sides. that will have a negative impact. it is an important asset to combat the jihad tests or the extremists. -- jihadists or the extremists. the muslim brothers in tunisia .ccused this is why we have to a differentiates between the muslim brothers and the girondists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. -- jihadists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. are they committed to values. this is the most important thing. >> and we have seen in syria where they had a violent fight between the muslim brothers and the ala
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our counter-terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a regionally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the bureacracy and red tape to provide assistance. i visited countr
in europe. any deployment will be defensive only. it will in no way support a in fly zone or any offensive operation. >> syria possessions missiles. we know they have the chemical weapons. of course, they also would have to be included in our calculations. this is will the reason why it is a matter of urgency to ensure effective defensive protection of our ally, turkey. >>reporter: these missile batteries will be programmed only to intercept missiles coming from syria which will be in operation in a few weeks. >>shepard: the syrian president is being wanted not to use the weapons but are there signs he could be getting the message? >>reporter: the white house press secretary seems to think so. >> the president spoke of this explicitly and we had this conversation yesterday about another component being proliferation. it is you spy, syria, or proliferation of, the chemical weapons stockpiles. it is hard to imagine they are not fully aware of the seriousness of the president's position on this. >> secretary of state clinton is in brawls attending the nato foreign minister session. she emphas
%. europe and the loo 20's. money goes where is welcome, and money and jobs are falling to other countries. we will have to change our tax had to make it more as the double the business. lou: as always. good to talk with you. much more on the fiscal cliff, the negotiations that went to college. we will take that up with the "a-team" and throughout the broadcast tonight. arabs bring to winter of discootent. chemical weapons, iranian nukes, tens of thousands protesting ease of snow is dictated. is u.s. intervention next? carl oliver north joins us in moments. runaway spending, our national debt top $16 trillion. who is doing the math? my next guest says it is all worse than people no. former house ways and means committee chairman bill archer after the break. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actuallyse... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bes, doesn't it? my gifto you! the capital one venture card! for any flightany time! th's double mil
corporatios. canadas 15%. europe and te loo 20's. money goes where iswelcome, and money and jobs are falling to other countries. we will have to change our tax had to make it more as the double the business. lou: as always. goo talk wit ou. much more on the fiscal cliff, the negotiations that wt to college. we will take that up wit the "a-team" and throughout the broadcast tonight. arabs brg to winter of discootent. chemical wapons, iranian nukes, tensf thousands protesting ease of snow is dictated. is u.s. intervention next? carl oliver north joins us in moments. runaway spending, our natinal debt top $16 trillion. whis doing the math? my next gest says it is all rse than people no. former house ways and means committee chairman bill archer aftethe break. ligations, but obligatio. i need trethink the core omy portfolio. what i really need is slee introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call-800-ishares for a prospectus which incdes investment objectives, risks, cha and expens
and votes coming up this week, secretary of state hillary clinton in europe this week has warned the assad regime and syria against resorting to chemical weapons. >> their behavior is reprehensible. their actions against their own people have been tragic. but there is no doubt that there's a line between even the horrors they have already inflicted on the syrian people and moving to what would be an internationally condemned step of utilizing their chemical weapons. >> joining me is former california congresswoman and president of the woodrow wilson center, jane harman. congresswoman, let's talk first about syria and the chemical weapon threat and all of the pressure now on the u.s. to recognize the opposition and to become more engaged. are there any options that you hear are likely to be taken? >> well, the focus is now on syria. events on the ground are changing. if these published reports are to be believed and there's some efforts to move chemical weapons i believe as hillary clinton has hinted, that will bring the entire international community into this game. that includes russia, w
europe and canada, but turkey is a long-standing member of nato. and turkey/syrian relationings have gone down over time. you can imagine a situation where the assad government picks a fight to widen the conflict. i don't know why they would do that but maybe they've come up with a theory that gives them a better shot at survival. maybe there's an intervention that freezes the regime in its current state. but dying regime with their back against the wall, those are unpredictable and dangerous regimes. i think all options are possible. i don't mean options on the table, but i mean there are a lot of different scene ae aeros could go baedly. it's more dangerous than the iranian situation right now. >> not good to hear. jim walsh, thank you for touching on all three of those top news stories for us. appreciate your insight this afternoon. we should add to the story as well that nato secretary-general says that the defensive missiles could be in place on the turk yishg syrian border in just weeks. in the meantime, the news out of syria from the opposition, 123 more people have been killed acr
this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go up for the wealthiest 2% and everybody else breathes a sigh of relief. there's some $2 trillion in cash sitting on the balance sheets of corporate america waiting to be put to work. the reason it hasn't been put to work is because of uncertainty. taxes are going to go up, the deficit is going to be reduced, some of that money is going to be released. just like ed schultz said, this is all very good news for the american economy. >> so basically the uncertainty is what's providing the certainty moving forward because people across the cou
networks in europe in a deal worth about 1.7 million >> will be right back with more on traffic and 5:09 is the time right now and there may still be a little jews destined blackberry. >> immigration and customs and force and says that will test the new >>-10 smart phones after phasing out older black bears in favor of i foams. >> the announcement has inject some life investors toward to the stock which had lost about 75% of its value in the last two years on evidence that the make or break >> tin line is gaining traction with are ibm's bread-and-butter customers. >> the >> tale of the sunday were 30. >> amazon spending isn't video service and clout player at a more mobile devices. >> the instant video app is now available on the iphone and the ipad itouch, with options for streaming or downloading content for amazons video collection. >> amazon prime customers also have streaming across to offer 30,000 movies and tv shows on the instant video at pp. >> even though research is bemercedes-benz has been seen record sales and the u.s., there still expected to lose its lead to rival bmw.
the paradigm when we imagined iran building a nuclear weapon putting it on a missile firing into europe or israel getting the technology being able to reach the united states, this is the sort of classic paradigm. the stock of the sum of all fears which is nuclear terrorism. i don't know if you want to comment on what are the risks, what are the real risks of wmd terrorism? >> there are significant risks to the terrorism. we all know the risks in the nuclear bomb and the part of los angeles etc am i etc, but when you look at the chemical and biological, they're also very significant threats there. for instance, you can look at what happened in the world war ii. the japanese army dropped infected fleas and china with 50,000 people, kind of a biotech they killed 50,000 people. chemical weapons, world war i chemical weapons killed at least 90,000 people. and you have these terrorist groups in the middle east. al qaeda has tried very hard for years to develop wmd. probably the closest they came was a group of retired pakistani leaders, really the nuclear program who teamed up with al qaeda
all of europe and the rest of the world. one of the italian leaders is stepping down and the other one planning a controversial comeback causing shock waves across europe. . fortunately we've got ink. . it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! >>> the cot come back is attracting attention. sylvia bers cone any is going to run again. ben weedman the thought of the return to berlusconi is rattling some folks' nerves. >> reporter: he's back. he says he's run for the premiership for the sixty time in 20 years. a year after he resigned as prime minister he's coming back more emphatica
for their own security and latin america and africa and europe and elsewhere the past decade of the war the most effective way to address longer-term challenges is to help build a capability of our allies we've seen this approach with our counter insurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and yemen and somalia. we are expanding to partners in order to address a broad range of security challenges in asia-pacific and the middle east, and as i said in europe, africa and latin america. to implement this element of the strategy, a the service is or retaining the security cooperation capabilities that we had held over a decade of war and making investments in the regional expertise through the army is regionally aligned brigade structure they are able to end fact engage on a rotational basis to assist other countries. the entire u.s. government is working to make our security cooperation particularly foreign military sales more responsive and more effective to cut through the bureaucracy and to cut through the red tape to be able to provide the assistance that we need to other countries without dela
. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our top to assert -- our counter- terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis -- regio0nally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the prophecy and red tape to provide the assistance -- through the burea crac
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